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The Dirtbags Summer sunflower growing contest

Let’s have some more flowers in our lives.

This summer, enter our sunflower growing competition to win prizes.

Every purchase will receive FREE seeds to get one growing. (you can enter with your own seeds, no purchase is necessary)

All you need to do is tend to your plant, and watch it grow, see how tall is grows. The tallest…wins. Simple! Email a photo of the sunflower with a tape measure next to it to dirtbagsclimb@gmail.com or tag us in social media.

As an extra bonus, you can save the seeds from that sunflower for the same thing next year. Cool.

selective focus photography of sunflower
Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

It is never too late to learn new things.

We, and some of our ambassadors, are joining in the fun too. We don’t know a lot about plants or looking after them so why not start, and bring you along the journey?

How to grow a sunflower:

  1. Plant seed in a small amount of damp soil.
  2. Put somewhere sunny, like a windowsill.
  3. Wait for it to germinate – keep watered (not too much)
  4. When the plant gets too big, plant in a bigger pot (or, if available, outside)
  5. It should take about 8 weeks for it to flower.

Good luck team!

The winner will be announced in October time.

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The Road to ClimbMuz

Siddrah introduces us to her new intiative to get more Muslim women into indoor climbing and how ClimbMuz was born.


I started climbing in my early 20’s when a friend introduced me to Mile End Climbing wall. While they never went back I continued climbing on and off throughout the years. I spent a long time climbing by myself, I did feel self- conscious not because I felt I needed representation but because I felt as though in my mind I was being judged for being scared, I have a huge fear of falling so it took me about 8 years to reach the top of a V0. I enjoyed climbing so I would always go back.

Years later I went to a Muslim meetup social event.

A group of us started climbing socially once a week, it did not occur to me how we were a group of Muslims in a majority white environment, I did not think about representation. I just accepted it as part of the norm. We stopped climbing as a group, ‘life happens’ and I as usual carried on climbing, making more climbing friends, this time around the majority of them were from the white community. I was proud of myself for being in this environment. I became comfortable being a minority as it was aiding my growth.  Also, on the other side a small part of me never really understood why people needed familiarity, someone who looks like them. If someone wants to try climbing, why not just turn up. I hadn’t realised how much of a barrier lack of inclusivity and representation is for many people.

On the 18th of June 2020 I had a conversation with someone about being a minority on the climbing wall…

“I’m used to being the only minority amongst people I climb with, I’m okay with that as the people who inspire me are beautiful souls. I personally don’t feel like I need representation.I grew up in a very desi (a person of Indian, Pakistani, or Bangladeshi birth or descent who lives abroad) high population of ethnic minorities, for me having non South Asian friends who don’t climb has given me the opportunity to mix in with people and learn from other backgrounds that are not my own. That includes people from the white community. Hanging around with my white climbing friends moves me out of my comfort zone and broadens my experiences.”

I then realised that perhaps the lack of diversity in the climbing walls was down to lack of representation.

I wanted to make a change. My journey in all of this involved having conversations with people, tuning into Louis Parkinson’s takeover Tuesday stories and actually realising that not everyone feels comfortable or has the confidence to be a minority in a predominantly white environment. For some, seeing someone in climbing walls who has a disability, who is a visible Muslim or from a minority background might provide some comfort in that space. It will give them the confidence to take up climbing as a sport if they have the representation that they need.

I want everyone to feel comfortable in trying something new

Creating a inclusive, welcome space using events was the way I felt I could make a difference. It was in June of this year that I approached friends about spreading the word and increasing diversity in climbing walls, then at the beginning of July, ClimbMuz happened. I run groups at my local climbing wall and offer places to Muslim women who have never stepped foot in a climbing wall before. I have always been reluctant to be visible on social media primarily because it can come with a lot of unwanted attention, undesirable comments and trolls. However, alongside all of that there is the opportunity to create something truly magical, to inspire a whole new group of people, to try and tip the balance, which I believe far exceeds the negative.

To find out more about Siddrah and ClimbMuz – visit her on instragram, @Climbmuz and keep an eye out for upcoming events.


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